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Journalism Students Off To A Terrific Start

Journalism student James talks about his cohort's successful start to the trimester.

We have officially passed the half way mark of the year and the second trimester for 2019 is well and truly underway as we enter week 6 of a 12-week trimester at Macleay College.

The newest batch of journalism students to join the college at the start of this trimester have certainly hit the ground running, with an unprecedented number of articles being published onto the college’s journalism website, Hatch, within their first five weeks.

New students have filed stories on topics ranging from the Matildas' performance in the soccer World Cup, to an Australia Post worker leaving a package on house roof.

To the surprise of mother of two, Charlie Bullis, she was able to publish her first news article in the first week of her degree.

“Working in the newsroom is a real highlight for me and I encourage everyone to embrace it; it’s an exciting opportunity,” she said.

“The lecturers are all highly experienced journalists and their real-world insight are the difference between theory and application.

“It has really helped me understand how my career as a journalist can progress.”

 

 

Macleay student Charlie Bullis' story for Hatch.


Every Wednesday, students are treated to an hour long guest lecture presented by industry professionals, personalities and organisations.

Guests have included John Bergin from the Walkley Foundation’s Google News Initiative, delving into the importance of journalists adapting to new ways of reporting and gathering news.

RELATED ARTICLE: Macleay Journalism: Making It In The Real World

Elizabeth Paton from Mindframe presented a talk this trimester, focussing on the importance of ethical reporting on stories relating to suicide, mental health, alcohol and drugs. This lecture also provided information on how journalists can access support on self care and how to seek help when reporting on the aforementioned topics.

 

 

New students have resoundingly acknowledged the great amount of support offered to them, whether it be to cope with personal circumstances, or during the process of transitioning from university to a private college.

Samantha Jurman was at Australian Catholic University, Strathfield, in the penultimate year of her Bachelor of Education (primary) degree. When asked about the transition from university to a private college, Sam said she had a “great first impression” of the college experience.

Ms Jurman displayed extraordinary coverage of the Matlidas’ campaign during the FIFA Women’s World Cup; publishing six articles in three weeks.

She cited the staff at Macleay as making her “feel important from day one”.

Similarly, ex-university student Solomon Vaiikee found his decision to transfer from the University of Newcastle to Macleay College as “a relatively easy move”.

“The support group I have and friends I have made at college made the transition as smooth as it possibly could’ve been,” he said.

Students were given the opportunity to attend a seminar presented by the Walkley Foundation at the NSW State Library. A panel of three prominent journalists discussed topics ranging from the AFP raids on several areas of the media; to the effects of vicarious trauma.

 

Following their attendance, two students had their articles published onto the foundation's website and newsletter.

Another recent addition to the Macleay College family is Zeinab Arjah.

“From the start, I felt I made the best decision to join Macleay, and I look forward to what the future has to offer with my journey learning about journalism,” she said.

From her five weeks of attending the college, Zeinab has found “as a student, if there is any time when I feel uncertain or worried about a situation, there is always someone to talk to about it.

“Our feelings aren’t discouraged and don’t get ignored. As a matter of fact, they are handled quite professionally.”

RELATED ARTICLE: We Discovered Why Macleay Alumni Are Thriving

This support shown to students is attributed to the success that journalism graduates experience post-study. In 2019, Macleay graduates so far have had incredible success gaining employment in the industry.

An impressive two thirds of Macleay’s alumni have acquired employment as journalists, compared to just 25% across Australian universities and colleges throughout all of last year.

Macleay College is already accepting applications for the third trimester of 2019.

In fact, we’d love to see you at one of our Open Days in either Sydney or Melbourne. 

 

Journalism at Macleay College

Students become working journalists from the first day they step into Macleay. They work on real stories in a real newsroom across all media platforms.

Journalism students are taught by industry experts that are up to date with the latest trends and are well connected in the industry.

Curious to know more about the Journalism programs at Macleay? Check out the student run Journalism website here. 

Click here for more information

Click here to apply now

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